The Latest Neuromarketing Insights

How to create the perfect shelf based on product lightness

How to create the perfect shelf based on product lightness

Generally, when visiting a supermarket, you don't want to waste your precious time by searching for the products you're looking for. In order to help us making decisions, our brains have a few biases in their way of seeing things.

We all know that marketeers are trying to get their products in the centre of a display, and that’s for a very good reason. However, new research shows that there’s another bias that influences our way of checking products. Apparently, our visual attention tends to automatically focus to the upper part of a display when we’re looking for a light-coloured product, and to the bottom for a dark coloured product.


The True Power of Front-of-Package Labels

The True Power of Front-of-Package Labels

There are only 24 hours in a day for us to get through our to-do lists. So how do we decide what to prioritize? Lucky for us, our brains use cognitive shortcuts to simplify decisions and cut corners. But here’s the catch: cutting corners has consequences. And when it comes to our brain, cutting corners leads to cognitive biases.


What sells better - something free or something off?

What sells better - something free or something off?

2 euros off or a complementary recipe book?

Price-based incentives remain one of the most common types of sales promotion. However, non-monetary incentives have become increasingly more common. Non-monetary incentives mean that consumers receive a free gift (premium) with a purchase of a product. A good example is McDonalds’s Happy Meal, which comes with a free toy.

So what do consumers prefer? 2 euros off or a complementary recipe book? A recent study looked at the fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) retail sector to explain why price cuts are superior to premiums.


How to use behavioral science to influence consumer decision-making

How to use behavioral science to influence consumer decision-making

Every day, we make decisions between multiple choices and alternatives. After a while, our brains find shortcuts to help us make decisions faster, in a more “efficient” way. This is called fast-thinking, according to Daniel Kahneman, a behavioral economist and author of Thinking Fast and Slow. When we have more time to decide, we begin to refer to our memories and past experiences to make a final choice; this is considered slow-thinking.


5 Best NeuroMarketing Insights You Might Have Missed - First Half Of 2018

New Neuromarketing Overview 2018

Are you up to date?

Knowledge is expanding faster and faster nowadays, it’s said to double every 12 hours! This means that there’s a lot of neuromarketing facts including new tips and tricks you might have missed. The past half year, there have been articles on dominance, packaging, the prediction of Tinder dates, pricing green products, and sound/smell in stores and ads. We summarized the main findings below. Sit back in your beach chair and get ready for some new inspiration!


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